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Fullbody Circuits

Workout Instructions

These Calisthenics beginner workouts are Fullbody Circuit routines. This means that it will train all the muscles in your body in circuit style. For best results, perform this workout 3 times per week, with at least a day of rest in between.

Perform each exercise for the indicated repetitions or time and rest, moving through the list until you complete the circuit. Then start again from the beginning until you’ve completed to the total number of rounds.

What routine should I do?

These beginner routines aim to improve your strength, endurance and lay a strong foundation for Calisthenics training. If you’re new to strength training or Calisthenics, start with Workout Routine #1 and follow it for at least 4 weeks before moving on to the next, more challenging routine. If you find the next routine too difficult, continue with your current routine and switch once you feel ready. Remember to keep challenging yourself as you grow stronger in order to continue improving.

How do I perform this exercise?

If you’re unsure how to perform a specific exercise, check out the video of the workout or refer to the exercise list at the bottom of the page. 

Workout Routine #1

Workout Type:

Fullbody circuit

Difficulty:

Beginner

Duration:

45 min, 4-5 rounds

Goal:

Strength, Endurance

#

Excercise

Reps

Rest

#1

Chin-Up with elastic band

5-8

60 sec

#2

Knee Push-Up

8-10

60 sec

#3

Standard Squat

10-12

30 sec

#4

Hollow Body Hold Beginner

20 sec

30 sec

#5

Negative Chin-Up

3-5

60 sec

#6

Push-Up Negative

5-7

60 sec

#7

Forward Lunge

8 per side

60 sec

#8

Standard Plank

20-30 sec

60 sec

#

Excercise

Repetitions

Rest

#1

Chin-Up with elastic band

5-8

60 sec

#2

Knee Push-Up

8-10

60 sec

#3

Standard Squat

10-12

30 sec

#4

Hollow Body Hold Beginner

20 sec

30 sec

#5

Negative Chin-Up

3-5

60 sec

#6

Push-Up Negative

5-7

60 sec

#7

Forward Lunge

8 per side

60 sec

#8

Standard Plank

20-30 sec

60 sec

Repeat for 4-5 rounds. For best results: repeat 3 x per week for at least 4 weeks before moving on. 

Workout Routine #2

Workout Type:

Fullbody circuit

Difficulty:

Beginner

Duration:

45 min, 3-4 rounds

Goal:

Strength, Endurance

#

Excercise

Reps

Rest

#1

Pull-Up with elastic band

5-8

120 sec

#2

Push-Up Negative

5-8

60 sec

#3

Standard Squat

15-20

60 sec

#4

Hollow Body Hold Intermediate

20 sec x 2

20 sec

#5

Negative Pull-Up

3-5

60 sec

#6

Incline Push-Up

6-8

60 sec

#7

Explosive Squat

12

60 sec

#8

Side Plank

20 sec / side

60 sec

#9

Bicycles

20 sec

60 sec

#

Excercise

Repetitions

Rest

#1

Pull-Up with elastic band

5-8

120 sec

#2

Push-Up Negative

5-8

60 sec

#3

Standard Squat

15-20

60 sec

#4

Hollow Body Hold Intermediate

20 sec x 2

20 sec

#5

Negative Pull-Up

3-5

60 sec

#6

Incline Push-Up

6-8

60 sec

#7

Explosive Squat

12

60 sec

#8

Side Plank

20 sec / side

60 sec

#9

Bicycles

20 sec

60 sec

Repeat for 3-4 rounds. For best results: repeat 3 x per week for at least 4 weeks before moving on. 

Workout Routine #3

Workout Type:

Fullbody circuit

Difficulty:

Beginner

Duration:

45 min, 3-4 rounds

Goal:

Strength, Endurance

#

Excercise

Reps

Rest

#1

Chin-Up

3-5

120 sec

#2

Push-Up

5-7

60 sec

#3

Standard Squat

20-25

60 sec

#4

Hollow Body Hold Advanced

20 sec x 2

20 sec

#5

Chin-Up with elastic band

10-12

120 sec

#6

Incline Push-Up

10-15

120 sec

#7

Explosive Squat

15

120 sec

#8

Side Plank

30 sec / side

60 sec

#9

Standard Plank

45 sec

60 sec

#

Excercise

Repetitions

Rest

#1

Chin-Up

3-5

120 sec

#2

Push-Up

5-7

60 sec

#3

Standard Squat

20-25

60 sec

#4

Hollow Body Hold Advanced

20 sec x 2

20 sec

#5

Chin-Up with elastic band

10-12

120 sec

#6

Incline Push-Up

10-15

120 sec

#7

Explosive Squat

15

120 sec

#8

Side Plank

30 sec / side

60 sec

#9

Standard Plank

45 sec

60 sec

Repeat for 3-4 rounds. For best results: repeat 3 x per week for at least 4 weeks before moving on. 

Exercise Explanation

Pull exercises

Pull-Up Bar Hang

Use a bar at suitable height, preferably a pull up bar. Should you not have access to one, a high racked barbell will work.  Stand on a bench/steps to easily reach the bar. Leaping up ferociously to grab the bar is not a good start. Grip the bar just over shoulder-width apart with an overhand grip (palms facing away from you).

 

Move your feet off the bench/steps so you are hanging. Keep your arms straight and relax your body to create a passive/dead weight hanging position. Hold for set amount of time.

Pull-Up (with elastic band)

The pull-up is one of the most effective exercises for strengthening the back muscles. Pull-ups work the following muscles of the back: Latissimus dorsi: largest upper back muscle that runs from the mid-back to under the armpit and shoulder blade. Trapezius: located from your neck out to both shoulders. The Pull-ups are done with your palms facing away your body, gripping the bar for a more back muscle activation.

With elastic band:
Attach an elastic band to the bar step into it with your feet. Perform the pull-up as normal.

Negative Pull-Up

Eccentric (the negative part of the exercise) pull-ups are a fantastic bodyweight exercise that builds upper-body strength, balance, and muscle mass. Unlike traditional pull-ups, the goal with eccentrics is to lower yourself as slowly as you can. The best results are obtained if you can perform a 5 seconds eccentric repetition every single time.

Chin-Up (with elastic band)

Chin-ups are done with your palms facing your body, like a curl grip used when doing bicep curls. Drive your elbows back and out as you pull your body up for a full back contraction. The supinated grip is more isolating and restrictive than a pronated grip. It will target your biceps, mildly improve your back strength, and improve your core.

With elastic band:
Attach an elastic band to the bar step into it with your feet. Perform the chin-up as normal.

Negative Chin-Up

Eccentric (the negative part of the exercise) chin-ups are a fantastic bodyweight exercise that builds upper-body strength, balance, and muscle mass. Unlike traditional chin-ups, the goal with eccentrics is to lower yourself as slowly as you can. The best results are obtained if you can perform a 5 seconds eccentric repetition every single time.

Push exercises

Incline Push-Up

1) Choose an elevated surface (a bench, block, etc.) for your push-ups, noting the higher up you are, the easier the push-ups will be.

2) Begin in front of your surface, placing your hands about shoulder-width apart.

3) Step back one leg at a time to come into a high plank. Find stability here, with the back of the legs active and the core engaged to protect the low back. Bring your gaze slightly forward to keep the neck straight. The body is in one straight line.

4) Slowly start bending your arms, elbows squeezing slightly toward the body, and lower your body until you're hovering just above your bench. Keep core and legs active.

5) Straighten the arms to come back up to your high plank

Push-Up Negative

A negative push-up is similar to a standard push-up with the exception that it is performed more slowly and with a greater level of control. By slowing down the push-up in the "negative" phase (when you lower your body toward the ground), you hold your bodyweight for longer, putting greater tension on your core, triceps, and lower back.

Standard Push-Up

A push-up is an exercise you can do anytime, anywhere, but only if you learn the how, what, when, and why of it.
Step by step exercise:

1) Hands should be slightly outside shoulder-width apart at chest level.

2) Feet should be hip-width apart and parallel to each other—not turned inward or outward.

3) Hips should be in line with the shoulders, and the lower back should have a neutral curve—not completely flat, but not overly curved either. To assist with keeping proper lower back alignment, slim your waistline by trying to pull your belly button in and tightening your abdominal muscles.

4) The head should be positioned so the ears are in line with the shoulders. They should not drop down toward the floor or looking up in front of the body.
Muscles targeted: chest, triceps and shoulder.

Leg exercises

Standard Squat

Squats, also known as bodyweight squats, are commonly used in training programs like Calisthenics and workout routines. They are only done using your own body weight, while regular squats may use additional weights instead. You should feel the squat in your thighs and in your glutes.
To do a standard squat:


1) Keep your feet at shoulder width apart and pointed straight ahead.

2) When squatting, your hips will move down and back.

3) Your lumbar curve should be maintained, and your heels should stay flat on the floor the entire time.

4) In squats, your hips will descend lower than your knees

Forward Lunge

The lunge is a popular leg-strengthening exercise with a multitude of variations to add variety to your workout. In addition, varying your technique allows you to emphasize different muscles or parts of those muscles.
How to do a forward lunge :

1) Stand tall with feet hip-width apart. Engage your core.

2) Take a big step forward with right leg. ...

3) Lower your body until right thigh is parallel to the floor and right shin is vertical.

4) Press into right heel to drive back up to starting position.

5) Repeat on the other side.

Explosive Squat

Squat Jumps are a powerful, plyometric exercise that strengthens your entire lower body and increases your heart rate for a significant calorie burn. Squat Jumps target quads, hamstrings, glutes and calves while also toning the ab and back muscles.
Step by step exercise:

1) 39. Start standing with feet hip distance apart and lower into a squat position by bending the knees.

2) Keep the spine straight, chest lifted, and knees behind toes.

3) Arms are in front of the chest for balance.

4) Jump straight up and swing arms overhead. Return to squat.

Core exercises

Hollow Body Hold Beginner + Intermediate + Advanced

A hollow body hold is an isometric exercise that involves flexing your core muscles while remaining in a static position. Perform hollow body holds by lying flat on your back. With your upper body, lift your arms overhead and raise your shoulder blades off the floor. The hollow body hold is an excellent move for targeting the transverse abdominis, rectus abdominis, obliques, quads, hip flexors, inner thighs, and erector spinae muscles. It also helps build strength and stabilization in your core and lower back muscles.

Standard Plank

The plank strengthens your spine, your rhomboids and trapezius, and your abdominal muscles, which naturally result in a strong posture as they grow in strength. Developing your posture can improve on a number of ailments, and prevent the onset of other ones.

Side Plank

Side planks work the deep spinal stabilizing muscle quadratus lumborum . Keeping this muscle strong can help reduce your risk of a back injury. Strengthens your core without stressing your back. Unlike crunches and situps, side planks don't put pressure on your lower back. Adding the side plank to your routine will improve posture and help reduce the possibility of developing lower back pain. Research has shown that a strong core can alleviate chronic lower back pain and help protect athletes from developing such problems in the first place.

Bicycles

The bicycle crunch is an effective ab exercise, reaching not only the usual abs but also the deep abs and the obliques. If you want to work your core, this air bicycle maneuver is a great choice. It's a no-equipment, beginner's level exercise you can do anywhere. Position yourself lying with your back on the ground and lift up and bend your knees. Proceed to make controlled cycling motions with your legs while keeping your lower back flat on the ground.

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